Flood Safety

Why do vehicles float? They float for the same reason a 97,000 ton aircraft carrier floats, buoyancy!

Where does this idea that "my heavy vehicle will keep me safe" come from? It comes from the false trust in the weight of the vehicle you are driving.

Many believe their 3,000 pound or more vehicle will remain in contact with the road surface, that it is too heavy to float. Think about that for a moment. Aircraft carriers weighing 97,000 tons float.

Vehicles, including ships, float because of buoyancy. In fact, most cars can be swept away in 18-24 inches of moving water. Trucks and SUVs do not fare much better with an additional 6-12 inches of clearance.

TADD

Real world video of a swift water rescue

Get your home ready for a flood.

  • Make sure you secure or protect any hazards in your home before the flood strikes.
  • Be prepared to turn off electrical power when there is standing water, fallen power lines, or before you evacuate. Turn off gas and water supplies before you evacuate. Secure structurally unstable building materials.
  • Buy a fire extinguisher if you don’t already have one. Make sure your family knows where it is and how to use it.
  • Buy and install sump pumps with back-up power.
  • Have a licensed electrician raise electric components (switches, sockets, circuit breakers and wiring) at least 12″ above your home’s projected flood elevation.

If you are under a flood watch or warning:

  • Gather the emergency supplies you previously stocked in your home and stay tuned to local radio or television station for updates.
  • Turn off all utilities at the main power switch and close the main gas valve if evacuation appears necessary.
  • Have your immunization records handy or be aware of your last tetanus shot, in case you should receive a puncture wound or a wound becomes contaminated during or after the flood.
  • Prepare an emergency water supply. Store at least 1 gallon of water per day for each person and each pet. Store at least a 3-day supply.
  • Bring outdoor possessions, such as lawn furniture, grills and trash cans inside or tie them down securely.

Get your home ready for a flood.

  • Make sure you secure or protect any hazards in your home before the flood strikes.
  • Be prepared to turn off electrical power when there is standing water, fallen power lines, or before you evacuate. Turn off gas and water supplies before you evacuate. Secure structurally unstable building materials.
  • Buy a fire extinguisher if you don’t already have one. Make sure your family knows where it is and how to use it.
  • Buy and install sump pumps with back-up power.
  • Have a licensed electrician raise electric components (switches, sockets, circuit breakers and wiring) at least 12″ above your home’s projected flood elevation.
  • For drains, toilets, and other sewer connections, install backflow valves or plugs to prevent floodwaters from entering.
  • Anchor fuel tanks which can contaminate your basement if torn free. An unanchored tank outside can be swept downstream and damage other houses.

Check your Emergency Go Kit.

Make sure it can support you for up to 3 days. Include medications, batteries, backup chargers and cords, pet supplies, baby/infant needs and things for children, including comfort items.

Go Kit

 

Go Kit on a budget