343.00 A Community Outreach Program (ACOP)

Purpose:

Since 1991, the Public Housing Agency (PHA) and the City of Saint Paul Police Department have collaborated to provide the community policing program known as A Community Outreach Program (ACOP) to create a drug-free and crime-free environment and to provide for the safety and protection of residents, employees, and visitors in public housing developments.

Scope:

The ACOP community-oriented team consists of both officers and community liaison officers (CLOs). ACOP efforts are focused primarily on the four Saint Paul Public Housing sites of McDonough, Mt. Airy, Roosevelt and Dunedin. The ACOP office is located directly in a family housing site.

Objectives:

  • Improve the working relationship between the public housing communities and the police department.
  • Expand the police services provided to public housing residents by utilizing various types of patrol methods, to include squad, bike and foot patrol.

ACOP Officers:

ACOP officers perform all the duties of police officers. They patrol public housing neighborhoods, respond to calls for service, and interact with residents and property managers.

In addition to regular duties, ACOP police officers perform numerous tasks designed to allow them a proactive approach to crime prevention and control. They routinely attend resident council meetings, coach local athletic teams, and provide leadership for various community groups and other youth activities. ACOP police officers are selected especially for their ability to provide positive role models for area youths. Their activities aim to empower the residents of our public housing communities.

CLO -- Community Liaison Officers (A.C.O.P. Interpreters):

Interpreters are trained to provide assistance to the residents of the four public housing areas in English, Lao, Hmong, Thai, Somali, Spanish, and other languages as available. They serve in the main office from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.  The ACOP interpreters provide an invaluable service to our public housing residents. Through their language skills, they provide an effective conduit to the police for people of diverse origins and backgrounds.

Revised July 1, 2011