Heritage Preservation Commission

Coronavirus (Covid-19) Update

Special Notice: The City of Saint Paul has determined that it is not practical nor prudent for the Heritage Preservation Commission (HPC) to meet in-person due to the COVID-19 health pandemic. All future meetings of the HPC will be conducted via Skype by telephone or computer, until this crisis has past.

It is also not feasible for members of the public to attend meetings at its regular location due to the health pandemic and emergency. Accordingly, NO meeting will be held in Council Chambers at 15 W. Kellogg Boulevard in the City of Saint Paul.

Members of the public may monitor this meeting remotely. Public comment materials can be submitted to George Gause at george.gause@stpaul.gov up to two (2) hours prior to the start of the meeting and will be provided to the Heritage Preservation Commission.
For more information on the City's response to Coronavirus (COVID-19), visit stpaul.gov/coronavirus.

November 2, 2020 HPC meeting - Cancelled

Background

The Heritage Preservation Commission (HPC) serves as an advisory body to the Mayor and the City Council on municipal heritage preservation matters. It was created by city ordinance in 1976 to protect and promote the heritage of the City of Saint Paul. The Commission consists of thirteen voting members who are residents of Saint Paul and are appointed by the Mayor with the advice and consent of the City Council. One of the members is a representative of the Ramsey County Historical Society and at present three of the members are professionally registered architects. The City of Saint Paul is a Certified Local Government (CLG) in the national Historic Preservation Program. The City is certified as having a heritage preservation commission and program that meets federal and state standards. Saint Paul's status as a CLG confirms its commitment to support a qualified heritage preservation commission, maintain a system for the survey and inventory of historic properties, enforce appropriate state and local legislation for the designation and protection of historic properties, and provide for public participation in its preservation program.

Members

Barbara Bezat
Leetta Douglas
Steven George (Vice Chair)
Teresa Kimker (Chair)
Robert Lubke
Stuart MacDonald
Paul Nelson
Joseph H. Peroutka
David Wagner

2020 Meetings

The Heritage Preservation Commission holds its regular meeting on Monday afternoon at 3:30 p.m.  every two weeks in City Council Chambers in City Hall.  Below you can find the agenda for future and past HPC meetings, along with documentation that was included with the Commissioners packets that were sent one week prior to the meeting.  This is not a full record of what occurred at the particular meeting.  Please contact staff if you have questions askHPC@ci.stpaul.mn.us

2020 Heritage Preservation Commission Meetings
 

Date Agenda Packet Information Minutes
November 2, 2020   MEETING CANCELLED  
October 19, 2020 10/19/20

V. Public Hearing
A. Selby Dale; New Construction & Demolition
B. 777 6th Street 
VI. Recommendations
A. 80 4th Street S
VII. Business
A. 2020 CLG Year End Report
B. HPC Listening Session comments
 

   
October 6, 2020  

HPC Public Listening Session Concerning Bias & Exclusion as a Result of Historic Districts
Meeting Begins at 4:30 - call in number (612) 315-7905 - Meeting ID: 449 108 365#

HPC Listening Session Information

 
October 5, 2020 10/5/20

V. Public Hearing
A. 701 Summit
B. 540 Portland
     540 Portland Aerial and Elevation Views
VI. Pre Application
VI. A. 2260 Summit part 1
           2260 Summit part 2

10/5/20
September 21, 2020 9/21/20 V. Public Hearing
V.B. 504 Selby
 
August 24, 2020  

The Saint Paul Heritage Preservation Commission (HPC) will hold a roundtable discussion for Commissioners at 3:30 pm to discuss the topic of bias and exclusion as a byproduct of historic designation. This will be a Skype meeting.
Two points have been developed to begin the conversation:
1. Historic preservation could result in economic exclusion creating a contemporary form of 'redlining'.
2. Designated sites can perpetuate a divisive form of nostalgia and may tell narratives of the culturally privileged.
 

8/24/20